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Sports nostalgia and useless facts

Entries in this blog

 

Best RF Seasons since 1979

Bored Blog Trivia Question: I really fucking hate one of the players on this list. Which one is it? (Hint: He's a rat piece of shit)   Top 20 Right Fielder Seasons since 1979 (per Win Shares)   1. Sammy Sosa, 2001 - Chicago Cubs 42.4 Win Shares   Year Ag Tm  Lg  G   AB    R    H   2B 3B  HR  RBI  SB CS  BB  SO   BA   OBP   SLG *OPS+  TB   SH  SF IBB HBP GDP +--------------+---+----+----+----+---+--+---+----+---+--+---+---+-----+-----+-----+----+----+---+---+---+---+---+ 2001 32 CHC NL 160  577  146  189  34  5  64  160   0  2 116 153  .328  .437  .737  203  425   0  12  37   6   6   2. Jose Canseco, 1988 - Oakland A's 38.9 3. Tony Gwynn, 1997 - San Diego Padres 38.6 4. Bobby Abreu, 2004 - Philadelphia Phillies 37.0 5. Ichiro Suzuki, 2001 - Seattle Mariners 36.0 6. Magglio Ordonez, 2007 - Detroit Tigers 35.6 7. Brian Giles, 2005 - San Diego Padres 35.4 8. Sammy Sosa, 1998 - Chicago Cubs 35.2 9. Tony Gwynn, 1984 - San Diego Padres 35.0 10. Manny Ramirez, 1999 - Cleveland Indians 34.7 11. Gary Sheffield, 2003 - Atlanta Braves 34.5 12. Gary Sheffield, 1996 - Florida Marlins 34.5 13. Shawn Green, 2001 - Los Angeles Dodgers 34.2 14. Ruben Sierra, 1989 - Texas Rangers 34.2 15. J.D. Drew, 2004 - Atlanta Braves 34.0 16. Dave Winfield, 1979 - San Diego Padres 33.0 17. Gary Sheffield, 2005 - New York Yankees 32.7 18. Lance Berkman, 2004 - Houston Astros 32.3 19. Larry Walker, 1997 - Colorado Rockies 32.0 20. Vladimir Guerrero, 2007 - Los Angeles Angels 31.6

Bored

Bored

 

Best LF Seasons since 1979

Say what you want about Barry Bonds, and really please I insist you say nasty things about him, but he was really, really fucking good.   Top 20 Left Fielder Seasons since 1979 (per Win Shares)   1. Barry Bonds, 2001 - San Francisco Giants 53.9 Win Shares   Year Ag Tm  Lg  G   AB    R    H   2B 3B  HR  RBI  SB CS  BB  SO   BA   OBP   SLG *OPS+  TB   SH  SF IBB HBP GDP +--------------+---+----+----+----+---+--+---+----+---+--+---+---+-----+-----+-----+----+----+---+---+---+---+---+ 2001 36 SFG NL 153  476  129  156  32  2  73  137  13  3 177  93  .328  .515  .863  259  411   0   2  35   9   5   2. Barry Bonds, 2004 - San Francisco Giants 53.0 3. Barry Bonds, 2002 - San Francisco Giants 48.9 4. Barry Bonds, 1993 - San Francisco Giants 46.7 5. Albert Pujols, 2003 - St. Louis Cardinals 41.1 6. Barry Bonds, 1992 - Pittsburgh Pirates 40.8 7. Barry Bonds, 2003 - San Francisco Giants 39.2 8. Barry Bonds, 1996 - San Francisco Giants 39.0 9. Rickey Henderson, 1990 - Oakland A's 38.9 10. Kevin Mitchell, 1989 - San Francisco Giants 37.7 11. Albert Belle, 1998 - Chicago White Sox 37.4 12. Barry Bonds, 1990 - Pittsburgh Pirates 36.7 13. Luis Gonzalez, 2001 - Arizona Diamondbacks 36.6 14. Barry Bonds, 1991 - Pittsburgh Pirates 36.5 15. Barry Bonds, 1997 - San Francisco Giants 36.4 16. Barry Bonds, 1995 - San Francisco Giants 36.1 17. Tim Raines, 1985 - Montreal Expos 35.8 18. Pedro Guerrero, 1985 - Los Angeles Dodgers 34.8 19. Rickey Henderson, 1980 - Oakland A's 33.9 20. Tim Raines, 1987 - Montreal Expos 33.8

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Bored

 

Best 1B Seasons since 1979

If you had to guess the first baseman who had the best single season of the last 30 years you might guess Frank Thomas, Mark McGwire, Jeff Bagwell, Albert Pujols, Jason Giambi, or maybe even Don Mattingly in his prime. And you'd be wrong, wrong, wrong, wrong, wrong, wrong...at least according to Win Shares. This player's numbers don't look huge at first glance but they came in a season when in the N.L. the average team only scored 3.94 runs a game, one of only four seasons since '79 that teams average under 4 runs a game in the N.L.   Top 20 First Baseman Seasons since 1979 (per Win Shares)   1. Will Clark, 1989 - San Francisco Giants 43.8 Win Shares   Year Ag Tm  Lg  G   AB    R    H   2B 3B  HR  RBI  SB CS  BB  SO   BA   OBP   SLG *OPS+  TB   SH  SF IBB HBP GDP +--------------+---+----+----+----+---+--+---+----+---+--+---+---+-----+-----+-----+----+----+---+---+---+---+---+ 1989 25 SFG NL 159  588  104  196  38  9  23  111   8  3  74 103  .333  .407  .546  175  321   0   8  14   5   6   2. Mark McGwire, 1998 - St. Louis Cardinals 40.9 3. Jeff Bagwell, 1996 - Houston Astros 40.7 4. Albert Pujols, 2004 - St. Louis Cardinals 39.7 5. Frank Thomas, 1997 - Chicago White Sox 39.1 6. Albert Pujols, 2006 - St. Louis Cardinals 38.6 7. Albert Pujols, 2005 - St. Louis Cardinals 38.3 8. Jason Giambi, 2000 - Oakland A's 38.2 9. Jason Giambi, 2001 - Oakland A's 37.8 10. Derrek Lee, 2005 - Chicago Cubs 37.2 11. Jeff Bagwell, 1999 - Houston Astros 36.9 12. John Olerud, 1993 - Toronto Blue Jays 36.7 13. Will Clark, 1988 - San Francisco Giants 36.7 14. Carlos Delgado, 2000 - Toronto Blue Jays 36.4 15. Will Clark, 1991 - San Francisco Giants 34.3 16. Jason Giambi, 2002 - New York Yankees 34 17. Jim Thome, 2002 - Cleveland Indians 33.9 18. Lance Berkman, 2006 - Houston Astros 33.7 19. John Olerud, 1998 - New York Mets 33.5 20. Todd Helton, 2003 - Colorado Rockies 33.5

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Bored

 

Best 2B Seasons since 1979

We actually had a tie for the top spot among second basemen between a current Hall of Famer and future Hall of Famer but the current one wins out per Win Shares Above Average as they played in six fewer games.   Top 20 Second Baseman Seasons since 1979 (per Win Shares)   1. Ryne Sandberg, 1984 - Chicago Cubs 38.3 Win Shares   Year Ag Tm  Lg  G   AB    R    H   2B 3B  HR  RBI  SB CS  BB  SO   BA   OBP   SLG *OPS+  TB   SH  SF IBB HBP GDP +--------------+---+----+----+----+---+--+---+----+---+--+---+---+-----+-----+-----+----+----+---+---+---+---+---+ 1984 24 CHC NL 156  636  114  200  36 19  19   84  32  7  52 101  .314  .367  .520  140  331   5   4   3   3   7   2. Craig Biggio, 1997 - Houston Astros 38.3 3. Roberto Alomar, 2001 - Cleveland Indians 37.4 4. Jeff Kent, 2000 - San Francisco Giants 36.9 5. Ryne Sandberg, 1991 - Chicago Cubs 36.6 6. Alfonso Soriano, 2000 - New York Yankees 35.5 7. Roberto Alomar, 1999 - Cleveland Indians 34.8 8. Craig Biggio, 1998 - Houston Astros 34.8 9. Roberto Alomar, 1992 - Toronto Blue Jays 34.2 10. Ryne Sandberg, 1990 - Chicago Cubs 33.8 11. Ryne Sandberg, 1992 - Chicago Cubs 33.1 12. Mark Loretta, 2004 - San Diego Padres 33.1 13. Craig Biggio, 1996 - Houston Astros 32.4 14. Bret Boone, 2001 - Seattle Mariners 31.7 15. Craig Biggio, 1992 - Houston Astros 31.7 16. Chuck Knoblauch, 1996 - Minnesota Twins 31.6 17. Robert Alomar, 1996 - Baltimore Orioles 31.2 18. Steve Sax, 1986 - Los Angeles Dodgers 30.8 19. Craig Biggio, 1999 - Houston Astros 30.7 20. Willie Randolph, 1980 - New York Yankees 30.5

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Bored

 

Worst RF Seasons since 1957

The worst offensive season by a rightfielder has stood for over 100 years as Jack Dunn in 1902 had an OPS+ of 56 (.211/.256/.249). But for this modern exercise, 1999 was officially The Year of the Shitty Hitting Outfielder as players from that season have topped the list at each outfield spot.   Top 25 (or so) Worst Offensive Rightfielder Seasons since 1957 (per OPS+)   1. Derek Bell, 1999 - Houston Astros 66 OPS+ (.236/.306/.350)   2t. Cory Snyder, 1989 - Cleveland Indians 70 2t. Mike Hershberger, 1964 - Chicago White Sox 70 4. Felix Jose, 1993 - Kansas City Royals 71 5. Mike Hershberger, 1965 - Kansas City A's 72 6. Dave May, 1974 - Milwaukee Brewers 73 7t. Tony Womack, 1999 - Arizona Diamondbacks 77 7t. Hosken Powell, 1980 - Minnesota Twins 77 9t. Jeromy Burnitz, 2002 - New York Mets 80 9t. Steve Finley, 1990 - Baltimore Orioles 80 9t. Glenn Wilson, 1987 - Philadelphia Phillies 80 12. Dave Martinez, 2000 - Tampa Bay Devil Rays/Chicago White Sox/Texas Rangers/Toronto Blue Jays 81 13t. Alex Ochoa, 2001 - Cincinnati Reds/Colorado Rockies 82 13t. Jose Guillen, 1997 - Pittsburgh Pirates 82 13t. Darnell Coles, 1989 - Seattle Mariners 82 13t. Bob Bailor, 1978 - Toronto Blue Jays 82 17. Mark Kotsay, 1999 - Florida Marlins 83 18t. Randy Winn, 2006 - San Francisco Giants 84 18t. Alexis Rios, 2005 - Toronto Blue Jays 84 18t. Juan Encarnacion, 2004 - Los Angeles Dodgers/Florida Marlins 84 18t. Roger Cedeno, 2003 - New York Mets 84 18t. Jose Guillen, 1998 - Pittsburgh Pirates 84 18t. Rob Deer, 1993 - Detroit Tigers/Boston Red Sox 84 18t. Ron Fairly, 1967 - Los Angeles Dodgers 84 25t. Danny Bautista, 2004 - Arizona Diamondbacks 85 25t. Brian Jordan, 2000 - Atlanta Braves 85 25t. Pat Kelly, 1970 - Kansas City Royals 85 25t. Gino Cimoli, 1963 - Kansas City A's 85

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Bored

 

Worst DH Seasons of All-Time

Now finally finishing off these Worst lists with designated hitters. Since the DH has only been around since 1973 these are the worst DH seasons of all-time. Unlike every other position, there is no additional value to be provided by DH beyond what they do with their bat. They aren't even expected to be threats on the basepaths either as most DH's are aging veterans or guys who are so slow they couldn't even handle first base. The top of the list falls into the aging veteran category as he was a great hitting catcher, who you can make a legit argument for him being a Hall of Famer, but he fell of a cliff offensively in this season at age 34 and goes down as the worst DH season by a wide margin. Not surprising there are a few all-time greats on this list who were the twilight of their careers.   Top 25 Worst Designated Hitter Seasons of All-Time (per OPS+)   1. Ted Simmons, 1984 - Milwaukee Brewers 61 OPS+ (.221/.269/.300)   2. Ruben Sierra, 1996 - New York Yankees/Detroit Tigers 75 3t. Alvin Davis, 1991 - Seattle Mariners 76 3t. Tommy Harper, 1974 - Boston Red Sox 76 5. Joe Carter, 1997 - Toronto Blue Jays 77 6t. Scott Hatteberg, 2005 - Oakland A's 81 6t. Dave Parker, 1991 - California Angels/Toronto Blue Jays 81 8t. Larry Sheets, 1988 - Baltimore Orioles 83 8t. Mitchell Page, 1979 - Oakland A's 83 10. Greg Vaughn, 1995 - Milwaukee Brewers 85 11t. Paul Molitor, 1998 - Minnesota Twins 86 11t. Eddie Murray, 1994 - Cleveland Indians 86 13. Eddie Murray, 1996 - Cleveland Indians/Baltimore Orioles 86 14t. Gerald Perry, 1990 - Kansas City Royals 90 14t. Dave Kingman, 1986 - Oakland A's 90 16. Julio Franco, 1997 - Cleveland Indians/Milwaukee Brewers 91 17t. Edgar Martinez, 2004 - Seattle Mariners 92 17t. Rico Carty, 1979 - Toronto Blue Jays 92 17t. Deron Johnson, 1975 - Chicago White Sox/Boston Red Sox 92 20t. Carl Everett, 2005 - Chicago White Sox 94 20t. George Brett, 1993 - Kansas City Royals 94 20t. Andre Thornton, 1985 - Cleveland Indians 94 20t. Reggie Jackson, 1984 - California Angels 94 24t. Carl Yastrzemski, 1981 - Boston Red Sox 95 24t. Hank Aaron, 1975 - Milwaukee Brewers 95

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Bored

 

Worst Pitcher Seasons since 1961

Back by popular demand, add another "Worst" list with the worst pitcher seasons since 1961 using ERA+. Checking baseball-reference.com, unlike qualifications for the batting title, it appears the qualification for the ERA title has never changed. In order to qualify a pitcher must pitch at least one inning per team game. Now I could have gone back to 1901 then but again it would been littered with too many early 20th century pitchers that most us have never heard of. The worst ERA+ of all-time was Rube Bressler of the Philadelphia Athletics in 1915 who posted an ERA+ of 56. To put that into context, he had an 5.20 ERA while the league ERA that season was 2.93.   I elected to go with 1961 since that was the beginning of the expansion era of MLB when the Angels and Senators (ver 2.0) were added to the American League. Now on the player lists there were a lot of ties and there would have been a ton for the pitcher list so to make it slightly less cluttered I break the ties by who threw more innings (as in who sucked in a larger sample). And the top of the list is someone who we could never forget, nor can we ever forget his wife's huge tits.   Top 25 Worst Pitcher Seasons since 1961 (per ERA+)   1. Jose Lima, 2005 - Kansas City Royals 63 ERA+ (6.99 ERA in 168 2/3 IP)   2. Jack Lamabe, 1964 - Boston Red Sox 65 3. Eric Milton, 2005 - Cincinnati Reds 66 (186 1/3 IP) 4. Rick Wise, 1968 - Philadelphia Phillies 66 (182) 5. Mark Davis, 1984 - San Francisco Giants 66 (174 2/3) 6. Bob Knepper, 1989 - Houston Astros/San Francisco Giants 66 (165) 7. Jim Deshaies, 1994 - Minnesota Twins 66 (130 1/3) 8. Warren Spahn, 1964 - Milwaukee Braves 67 9. Matt Keough, 1982 - Oakland A's 68 (209 1/3) 10. Steve Arlin, 1973 - San Diego Padres 68 (180) 11. Phil Ortega, 1965 - Washington Senators 68 (179 2/3) 12. Javier Vazquez, 1998 - Montreal Expos 69 13. Vida Blue, 1979 - San Francisco Giants 70 (237) 14. Frank Baumann, 1961 - Chicago White Sox 70 (187 2/3) 15. Pete Broberg, 1972 - Texas Rangers 70 (176 1/3) 16. Joel Pineiro, 2006 - Seattle Mariners 70 (165 2/3) 17. Terry Mulholland, 1995 - San Francisco Giants 70 (149) 18. Dick Ruthven, 1981 - Philadelphia Phillies 70 (146 2/3) 19. Willie Fraser, 1988 - California Angels 71 (194 2/3) 20. Bob Walk, 1993 - Pittsburgh Pirates 71 (187) 21. Bill Singer, 1975 - California Angels 71 (175) 22. Brandon Duckworth, 2002 - Philadelphia Phillies 71 (163) 23. Terry Mulholland, 1994 - New York Yankees 71 (120) 24. Jack Fisher, 1967 - New York Mets 72 (220 1/3) 25. Joe Coleman, 1975 - Detroit Tigers 72 (201)

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Bored

 

Worst CF Seasons since 1957

The worst offensive season by a centerfielder since 1901 was Alex Metzler in 1930 with an OPS+ of 56 (.236/.313/.302). The player on the top of this particular list came very close to breaking that record in 1999 (the year of shitting hitting outfielders?) and also made my Worst Hitters since 1986 list. Interesting thing about this list is that most of these punchless performances have happened in the last 20 years.   Top 25 (or so) Worst Offensive Centerfielder Seasons since 1957 (per OPS+)   1. Darren Lewis, 1999 - Boston Red Sox 57 OPS+ (.240/.311/.309)   2. Gary Pettis, 1988 - Detroit Tigers 61 3. Marquis Grissom, 2000 - Milwaukee Brewers 63 4. Darren Lewis, 1995 - San Francisco Giants/Cincinnati Reds 64 5t. Endy Chavez, 2003 - Montreal Expos 65 5t. Brian Hunter, 1998 - Detroit Tigers 65 5t. Chuck Carr, 1994 - Florida Marlins 65 5t. Brian McRrae, 1992 - Kansas City Royals 65 5t. Bill Virdon, 1964 - Pittsburgh Pirates 65 10. Peter Bergeron, 2000 - Montreal Expos 67 11t. Juan Pierre, 2002 - Colorado Rockies 68 11t. Gerald Williams, 1997 - Milwaukee Brewers 68 11t. Omar Moreno, 1982 - Pittsburgh Pirates 68 11t. Bill Virdon, 1962 - Pittsburgh Pirates 68 15t. Tom Goodwin, 2000 - Colorado Rockies/Los Angeles Dodgers 69 15t. Tom Goodwin, 1997 - Kansas City Royals/Texas Rangers 69 15t. Eric Yelding, 1990 - Houston Astros 69 18t. Tom Goodwin, 1996 - Kansas City Royals 70 18t. Darren Lewis, 1993 - San Francisco Giants 70 18t. Rick Manning, 1979 - Cleveland Indians 70 18t. Jim Piersall, 1962 - Washington Senators 70 22t. Doug Glanville, 2001 - Philadelphia Phillies 71 22t. Doug Glanville, 2000 - Philadelphia Phillies 71 22t. Chris Singleton, 2000 - Chicago White Sox 71 22t. Bob Dernier, 1985 - Chicago Cubs 71 22t. Rick Manning, 1983 - Cleveland Indians/Milwaukee Brewers 71

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Bored

 

Worst 3B Seasons since 1957

Out of the way quickly, the worst offensive single season by a third baseman was Art Scharein in 1933 who nearly matched the year with an OPS+ of 34. But we're only concerned with the last 50 years and that mark was set just last season! Why didn't ESPN cover this?   Top 25 (or so) Worst Offensive Third Baseman Seasons since 1957 (per OPS+)   1. Nick Punto, 2007 - Minnesota Twins 52 OPS+ (.210/.291/.271)   2. Scott Brosius, 1997 - Oakland A's 53 3. Brooks Robinson, 1975 - Baltimore Orioles 58 4t. Damion Easley, 1994 - California Angels 59 4t. Clete Boyer, 1964 - New York Yankees 59 6t. Jose Hernandez, 2003 - Colorado Rockies/Chicago Cubs/Pittsburgh Pirates 60 6t. Vinny Castilla, 2002 - Atlanta Braves 60 6t. Aurelio Rodriguez, 1974 - Detroit Tigers 60 9t. Terry Pendleton, 1986 - St. Louis Cardinals 62 9t. Bubba Phillips, 1963 - Detroit Tigers 62 11. Aurelio Rodriguez, 1973 - Detroit Tigers 63 12. Terry Pendleton, 1985 - St. Louis Cardinals 66 13t. Tim Wallach, 1993 - Los Angeles Dodgers 67 13t. Aurelio Rodriguez, 1969 - California Angels 67 13t. Don Wert, 1968 - Detroit Tigers 67 16t. Terry Pendleton, 1996 - Florida Marlins/Atlanta Braves 68 16t. Hubie Brooks, 1983 - New York Mets 68 16t. John Kennedy, 1964 - Washington Senators 68 19t. Tim Hulett, 1986 - Chicago White Sox 69 19t. Manny Castillo, 1982 - Seattle Mariners 69 19t. Brooks Robinson, 1958 - Baltimore Orioles 69 22t. Jeff Cirillo, 2002 - Seattle Mariners 70 22t. Cal Ripken, 2001 - Baltimore Orioles 70 22t. Scott Brosius, 2000 - New York Yankees 70 25t. Geoff Blum, 2001 - Montreal Expos 71 25t. Ken Caminiti, 1990 - Houston Astros 71 25t. Aurelio Rodriguez, 1976 - Detroit Tigers 71

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Bored

 

Worst 1B Seasons since 1957

Continuing with more of the worst. Now there are positions in baseball where clubs are very willing to sacrifice defense for offense, middle infielders being most common. If you have an excellent defensive shortstop or second baseman you can often overlook their offensive shortcomings. First base is not one of those positions. Sure a great defensive first baseman is nice to have but if they can't hit, it's not wise to keep them in the line up everyday if you have a better hitting alternative who isn't at least a complete butcher in the field.   The worst hitting season for a first baseman since 1901 was by Ivy Griffin in 1920 who posted a blistering hitting line of .238/.281/.274 for an OPS+ of 47 in 505 plate appearances, which means he'd qualify under the modern rules for the batting title. Now Griffin played on a horrific Philadelphia A's team that lost 106 games. On the other hand the man who posted the worst hitting season for a first baseman since 1957 played on a team who made it to the World Series and you might have heard of him too, no offense to Mr. Griffin. Actually there was a tie for first/worst so the tiebreak was who had more plate appearances.   Top 25 Worst Offensive First Baseman Seasons since 1957 (per OPS+)   1. Pete Rose, 1983 - Philadelphia Phillies 69 OPS+ (.245/.316/.286)   2. Pete Runnels, 1957 - Washington Senators 69 3. Enos Cabell, 1981 - San Francisco Giants 72 4t. Kevin Young, 1993 - Pittsburgh Pirates 73 4t. Whitey Lockman, 1957 - New York Giants 73 6. Darin Erstad, 1999 - Anaheim Angels 74 7. Dave Stapleton, 1983 - Boston Red Sox 76 8t. Mike Squires, 1981 - Chicago White Sox 78 8t. Tony Taylor, 1967 - Philadelphia Phillies 78 8t. Lee Thomas, 1963 - Los Angeles Angels 78 11t. Kevin Young, 2001 - Pittsburgh Pirates 80 11t. Dale Murphy, 1978 - Atlanta Braves 80 13t. Ron Coomer, 2000 - Minnesota Twins 81 13t. J.T. Snow, 1996 - California Angels 81 13t. David Segui, 1994 - New York Mets 81 16. Bill Buckner, 1973 - Los Angeles Dodgers 82 17t. Cecil Cooper, 1986 - Milwaukee Brewers 83 17t. Vic Power, 1957 - Kansas City A's 83 19t. Ken Harvey, 2003 - Kansas City Royals 84 19t. Keith Moreland, 1988 - San Diego Padres 84 19t. Willie Montanez, 1979 - New York Mets/Texas Rangers 84 19t. Rusty Staub, 1963 - Houston Colt .45's 84 19t. Vic Power, 1961 - Cleveland Indians 84 24t. Pete O'Brien, 1983 - Texas Rangers 85 24t. Frank Thomas, 1960 - Chicago Cubs 85

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Bored

 

Worst Catcher Seasons since 1957

Baseball-Reference.com Play Index is saving this blog with more useless lists1 Today I list the 25 worst individual offensive seasons according to OPS+ since 1957, who qualified for the batting title in their given year. Why 1957 instead of all the way back to the beginning modern era in 1901? Because I'm lazy and because the current guidelines for qualifying for the batting title were adopted in '57. The current rule is a player must average 3.1 plate appearances per total number of games played by their team which with the 162 game schedule works out to 502 plate appearances. Here's a copy and paste of the guidelines through out the years from Baseball-Reference.com:   If we took into account players prior to 1957 it would be littered with early 20th century players, who many of you including myself probably never heard of and wouldn't be able to add comments like "Hey I remember him, he sucked!" In case you were wondering, the worst offensive season ever by a catcher who qualified for the batting title was Bill Bergen in 1909 who had an OPS+ of 1 (.139/.163/.156 in 372 plate appearances). Again like with my last entry a lot these guys played a lot due to superior defense (Bob Boone is on it four times) but some probably shouldn't have been playing much at all.   Top 25 Worst Offensive Catcher Single Seasons (per OPS+)   1. Matt Walbeck, 1994 - Minnesota Twins 37 OPS+ (.204/.246/.284)   2. Brad Ausmus, 2006 - Houston Astros 54 3t. Brad Ausmus, 2003 - Houston Astros 55 3t. Jim Sundberg, 1975 - Texas Rangers 55 5. Joe Girardi, 1995 - Colorado Rockies 58 6t. Jason Kendall, 2007 - Oakland A's/Chicago Cubs 63 6t. Bob Boone, 1986 - California Angels 63 8. Tony Pena, 1991 - Boston Red Sox 66 9t. Michael Barrett, 2001 - Montreal Expos 68 9t. Joe Girardi, 1994 - Colorado Rockies 68 11t. Kirt Manwaring, 1994 - San Francisco Giants 69 11t. Johnny Edwards, 1970 - Houston Astros 69 13. Bob Boone, 1974 - Philadelphia Phillies 70 14. B.J. Surhoff, 1988 - Milwaukee Brewers 71 15. Bob Boone, 1985 - California Angels 72 16t. Butch Wynegar, 1978 - Minnesota Twins 73 16t. Randy Hundley, 1968 - Chicago Cubs 73 18. Joe Oliver, 1993 - Cincinnati Reds 74 19t. Pat Borders, 1993 - Toronto Blue Jays 75 19t. Bob Boone, 1980 - Philadelphia Phillies 75 21t. Benito Santiago, 2001 - San Francisco Giants 76 21t. Benito Santiago, 1993 - Florida Marlins 76 21t. Rick Cerone, 1979 - Toronto Blue Jays 76 21t. John Bateman, 1971 - Montreal Expos 76 21t. John Bateman, 1970 - Montreal Expos 76

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Bored

 

All-Star Reserves Predictions

Wow, two entries in one week? I'm gonna need an extended vacation after exhausting myself like this.   Next Sunday the All-Star Game reserves will be selected for this year's extra special, Yankee Stadium Circle Jerk All-Star Game presented by FOX. And hey it counts or something. I originally intended on picking my own All-Star team using all that stat geek crap I typically use but that was going to take longer than I wanted so instead I decided to make predictions for All-Star reserves primarily relying on those Joe Morgan friendly stats (AVG, HR, RBI, Wins, ERA, Saves). Player balloting will be going on this week for picking the reserves so doubt too much of what happens this week will effect the results.   Here are the current vote leaders in the fan balloting as of this past week:   American League   C: Joe Mauer, Twins 1B: Kevin Youkilis, Red Sox 2B: Dustin Pedroia, Red Sox 3B: Alex Rodriguez, Yankees SS: Derek Jeter, Yankees OF: Manny Ramirez, Red Sox; Josh Hamilton, Rangers; Ichiro Suzuki, Mariners   Only race in doubt is at catcher as Mauer tries to hold off Jason Varitek (really, Red Sox fans?).   National League   C: Geovany Soto, Cubs 1B: Lance Berkman, Astros 2B: Chase Utley, Phillies 3B: Chipper Jones, Braves SS: Hanley Ramirez, Marlins OF: Alfonso Soriano, Cubs; Kosuke Fukudome, Cubs; Ken Griffey Jr., Reds   The one race that appears to be coming down to the wire is at shortstop as Ramirez and Miguel Tejada are locked in a tight battle. Outside chance Ryan Braun will slip into the final outfield spot. Now on to my predictions.   My A.L. Reserves Predictions   C: A.J. Pierzynski, White Sox 1B: Justin Morneau, Twins 2B: Ian Kinsler, Rangers; Brian Roberts, Orioles 3B: Mike Lowell, Red Sox SS: Michael Young, Rangers OF: Magglio Ordonez, Tigers; Carlos Quentin, White Sox; Vladimir Guerrero, Angels; Jermaine Dye, White Sox DH: Hideki Matsui, Yankees   SP: Cliff Lee, Indians; Joe Saunders, Angels; Mike Mussina, Yankees; Vicente Padilla, Rangers; Justin Duchscherer, Athletics; Scott Kazmir, Rays; Roy Halladay, Blue Jays RP: Francisco Rodriguez, Angels; Mariano Rivera Yankees; Jonathan Papelbon, Red Sox; Joe Nathan, Twins; Joakim Soria, Royals   My N.L. Reserves Predictions   C: Brian McCann, Braves; Russell Martin, Dodgers 1B: Albert Pujols, Cardinals; Adrian Gonzalez, Padres 2B: Dan Uggla, Marlins 3B: David Wright Mets; Aramis Ramirez, Cubs SS: Jose Reyes, Mets OF: Ryan Braun, Brewers; Pat Burrell, Phillies; Carlos Lee, Astros; Xavier Nady, Pirates   SP: Brandon Webb, Diamondbacks; Edinson Volquez, Reds; Ben Sheets, Brewers; Aaron Cook, Rockies; Ryan Dempster, Cubs; Tim Lincecum, Giants; Carlos Zambrano, Cubs; Kyle Lohse, Cardinals RP: Brad Lidge, Phillies; Billy Wagner, Mets; Kerry Wood, Cubs; Jon Rauch, Nationals

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Bored

 

Draftback: 1997 NBA Draft

My blog is still not dead...getting closer though. But I remembered the NBA Draft was this week so I can get another Draftback entry in. With the NBA Draft I take different approach as I rank the players using the basketball version of Win Shares. I don't know how reliable the statistic is, and I don't quite agree with all the rankings, but at least it's an objective way to compare these player's careers at this point.     1997 NBA Draft per Career Win Shares   1. Tim Duncan, San Antonio - 399 Career Win Shares (1st Pick) 2. Chauncey Billups, Boston - 252 (3rd) 3. Tracy McGrady, Toronto - 246 (9th) 4. Antonio Daniels, Vancouver - 131 (4th) 5. Derek Anderson, Cleveland - 120 (13th) 6. Keith Van Horn, Philadelphia (traded to New Jersey) - 115 (2nd)   7t. Tim Thomas, New Jersey (traded to Philadelphia) - 94 (7th) 7t. Bobby Jackson, Seattle (traded to Denver) - 94 (23rd) 9. Tony Battie, Denver - 91 (5th) 10t. Kelvin Cato, Dallas (traded to Portland) - 83 (15th) 10t. Brevin Knight, Cleveland - 83 (16th) 12. Austin Croshere, Indiana - 81 (12th)   13. Stephen Jackson, Phoenix - 79 (42nd) 14. Scott Pollard, Detroit - 78 (19th) 15. Alvin Williams, Portland - 61 (48th) 16t. Adonal Foyle, Golden State - 60 (8th) 16t. Anthony Johnson, Sacramento - 60 (39th) 18. Danny Fortson, Milwaukee (traded to Denver) - 57 (10th)   19. Mark Blount, Seattle - 56 (54th) 20. Jacque Vaughn, Utah - 51 (27th) 21. Marc Jackson, Golden State - 38 (37th) 22t. Maurice Taylor, L.A. Clippers - 37 (14th) 22t. Anthony Parker, New Jersey (traded to Philadelphia) - 37 (21st) 24. Ron Mercer, Boston - 33 (6th)   25. Cedric Henderson, Cleveland - 21 (44th) 26. Chris Crawford, Atlanta - 19 (50th) 27. Tariq Abdul-Wahad, Sacramento - 17 (11th) 28. Predrag Drobnjak, Washington - 15 (48th) 29. John Thomas, New York - 9 (25th) 30t. Chris Anstey, Portland (traded to Dallas) - 7 (19th)   30t. Charles Smith, Miami - 7 (26th) 32. Ed Gray, Atlanta - 3 (22nd) 33t. Rodrick Rhodes, Houston - 2 (24th) 33t. Keith Booth, Chicago - 2 (28th) 33t. Charles O'Bannon, Detroit - 2 (31st) 33t. Jerald Honeycutt, Milwaukee - 2 (38th)   33t. DeJuan Wheat, L.A. Lakers - 2 (51st) 38t. Johnny Taylor, Orlando - 1 (17th) 38t. Marko Milic, Philadelphia - 1 (33rd) 38t. Bubba Wells, Dallas - 1 (34th) 38t. Kebu Stewart, Philadelphia (35th) 38t. Jason Lawson, Denver - 1 (41st)   38t. Eric Washington, Orlando - 1 (46th)   The Zero Club   Paul Grant, Minnesota (20th) James Cotton, Denver (32nd) James Collins, Philadelphia (36th) God Shammgod, Washington (45th)   Never Played in the NBA   Serge Zwikker, Houston (29th) Mark Sanford, Miami (30th) Eddie Elisma, Seattle (40th) Gordon Malone, Minnesota (43rd) Alain Digbeu, Atlanta (49th) C.J. Bruton, Vancouver (52nd) Paul Rogers, L.A. Lakers (53rd) Ben Pepper, Boston (55th) Nate Erdmann, Utah (56th) Roberto Duenas, Chicago (57th)   Most Win Shares with Team they were Drafted by   1. Tim Duncan, 399 2. Austin Croshere, 74 3. Keith Van Horn, 60 (draft day trade) 4. Adonal Foyle, 56 5. Brevin Knight, 37 6. Tracy McGrady, 36 7. Cedric Henderson, 21 8. Derek Anderson, 20 9. Chris Crawford, 19 10. Ron Mercer, 15

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Draftback: 1998 MLB Draft

Hey look my blog isn't dead! Okay it's pretty close to being dead but decided to throw together a Draftback baseball entry before this upcoming week's MLB Draft.     1. Phillies - Pat Burrell, Third Baseman, Miami   Heavily scrutinized, but very productive player throughout his career outside a dreadful 2003 season.   2. Athletics - Mark Mulder, Pitcher, Michigan State   Rotator cuff problems have pretty much ruined a once promising career.   3. Cubs - Corey Patterson, Outfielder, Harrison High School (Harrison, GA)   Toolsy player who has never figured out the strikezone.   4. Royals - Jeff Austin, Pitcher, Stanford   Usually doesn't take three picks to get to the first bust in a baseball draft. 65 1/3 career innings in the Majors.   5. Cardinals - J.D. Drew, Outfielder, Florida State   Of course the year before Drew (and agent Scott Boras) infamously refused to sign with the Phillies after being the #2 pick overall. Incredibly talented player but injuries have hampered him for most of his career.   6. Twins - Ryan Mills, Pitcher, Arizona State   Didn't reach Triple-A until 2003 and was out of baseball after 2004.   7. Reds - Austin Kearns, Outfielder, Lafayette High School (Lexington, KY)   Has shown flashes of potentially being a great hitter in the past but injuries and a lack of consistency have held him back.   8. Blue Jays - Felipe Lopez, Shortstop, Lake Brantley High School (Altamonte Springs, FL)   Had one great year offensively in 2005 but not much else and is poor defensively.   9. Padres - Sean Burroughs, Third Baseman, Wilson High School (Long Beach, CA)   Never developed any power and now appears to be out of organized baseball.   10. Rangers - Carlos Pena, First Baseman, Northeastern   Very odd career, broke out with a monster season last year but remains to be seen if it was a fluke or not.   11. Expos - Josh McKinley, Shortstop, Malvern Prep School (PA)   Never got past Double-A, hit .254/.340/.375 in seven minor league seasons.   12. Red Sox - Adam Everett, Shortstop, South Carolina   Great defense, terrible offense.   13. Brewers - J.M. Gold, Pitcher, Toms River North High School (Toms River North, NJ)   Topped out at high Single-A ball.   14. Tigers - Jeff Weaver, Pitcher, Fresno State   Easy to forget he was pretty impressive early on his career but now hanging by a thread with the Brewers Triple-A squad.   15. Pirates - Clint Johnston, Pitcher, Vanderbilt   Gave up pitching after 2001, but becoming a first baseman only got him to Double-A.   16. White Sox - Kip Wells, Pitcher, Baylor   Sorta like Weaver in that he showed some promise early on his career but has stringed together some truly awful seasons.   17. Astros - Brad Lidge, Pitcher, Notre Dame   The demise of his career post-Pujols has been greatly exaggerated.   18. Angels - Seth Etherton, Pitcher, USC   6.30 ERA in 115 1/3 innings in the Majors.   19. Giants - Tony Torcato, Third Baseman, Woodland High School (Woodland, CA)   Only had 53 MLB plate appearances.   20. Indians - C.C. Sabathia, Pitcher, Vallejo High School (Vallejo, CA)   Cy Young winner last season who barring injury will cash in big this offseason, even with a potential down year.   21. Mets - Jason Tyner, Outfielder, Texas A&M   Has some how fooled teams into giving him 1400+ plate appearances in the Majors. Has hit four homeruns in nearly in 5000 plate appearances in professional baseball and he's a corner oufielder!   22. Mariners - Matt Thornton, Pitcher, Grand Valley State   Next Randy Johnson he was not but has become a decent reliever.   23. Dodgers - Bubba Crosby, Outfielder, Rice   Great name but not so good player.   24. Yankees - Andy Brown, Outfielder, Richmond High School (Richmond, IN)   .219 career hitter in eight minor league seasons.   25. Giants - Nate Bump, Pitcher, Penn State   Had a bumpy career. *rim shot*   26. Orioles - Rick Elder, Outfielder, Sprayberry High School (Marietta, GA)   Never got past high Single-A and lasted only five seasons in the minors.   27. Marlins - Chip Ambres, Outfielder, West Brook High School (Beaumont, TX)   Pretty much a career minor leaguer.   28. Rockies - Matt Roney, Pitcher, Edmond North High School (Edmond North, OK)   An extended stint with the 119-loss Tigers in 2003 has been about it for him.   29. Giants - Arturo McDowell, Outfielder, Forest Hill High School (West Palm Beach, FL)   Another swing and a miss for Brian Sabean.   30. Royals - Matt Burch, Pitcher, Virginia Commonwealth   Double-A was as good as it got for him.     Other Picks of Note   33. Expos - Brad Wilkerson 35. White Sox - Aaron Rowand 43. Yankees - Mark Prior (did not sign) 50. Reds - Adam Dunn 57. Tigers - Brandon Inge 83. Rangers - Barry Zito (did not sign) 162. Devil Rays - Aubrey Huff 176. Brewers - Bill Hall 210. Rockies - Matt Holliday 225. Athletics - Eric Byrnes 258. Cardinals - Jack Wilson 265. Red Sox - Mark Teixeira (did not sign) 272. Astros - Morgan Ensberg 390. Rockies - Juan Pierre 411. Blue Jays - Jay Gibbons 499. Twins - J.J. Putz (did not sign) 500. Reds - B.J. Ryan 550. Marlins - Adam LaRoche (did not sign) 609. Orioles - Cliff Lee (did not sign) 1139. White Sox - Mark Buehrle

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All-Time NFL Draft, Picks 31-60

I'm going to keep doing this until I start grasping at straws to find decent players to fill out every pick, which I had to do with at least one of the following picks. As I get further down the list the honorable mention picks become increasingly difficult. Again this is just since the merger and what the player did over the course of their career, not what they necessarily did for the team that drafted them which is plainly obvious with pick #33.   31. L.A. Rams – Nolan Cromwell, S, Kansas 1977 Honorable Mention: Roman Phifer (1991), Carl Pickens (1992), Al Wilson (1999)   32. L.A. Rams – Henry Ellard, WR, Fresno State 1983 Honorable Mention: Fred Smerlas (1979), Ray Donaldson (1980), Drew Brees (2001)   33. Atlanta – Brett Favre, QB, Southern Miss 1991 Honorable Mention: Fred Dean (1975), Wesley Walker (1977), Isaac Bruce (1994)   34. Pittsburgh – Jack Ham, LB, Penn State 1971 Honorable Mention: Steve Nelson (1974), Tim McDonald (1987), Carnell Lake (1989)   35. Tampa Bay – Mike Alstott, FB, Purdue 1996 Honorable Mention: Keith Fahnhorst (1974), Christian Okoye (1987), Alge Crumpler (2001)   36. N.Y. Giants – Tiki Barber, RB, Virginia 1997 Honorable Mention: Kevin Mawae (1994), Lawyer Milloy (1996), Chad Johnson (2001)   37. Philadelphia – Randall Cunnigham, QB, UNLV 1985 Honorable Mention: Cris Collinsworth (1981), Leonard Marshall (1983), Darren Woodson (1992)   38. Chicago – Mike Singletary, LB, Baylor 1981 Honorable Mention: Doug English (1975), Boomer Esiason (1984), Flozell Adams (1998)   39. Buffalo – Darryl Talley, LB, West Virginia 1983 Honorable Mention: Keena Turner (1980), Daryl Johnston (1989), Keith Sims (1990)   40. N.Y. Giants – Michael Strahan, DE, Texas Southern 1993 Honorable Mention: Bob Baumhower (1978), Al Baker (1979), Thurman Thomas (1988)   41. New England – Andre Tippett, LB, Iowa 1982 Honorable Mention: Mark Gastineau (1979), Dave Waymer (1980), Ken Norton (1988)   42. San Francisco – Randy Cross, G, UCLA 1976 Honorable Mention: Rulon Jones (1980), Charlie Garner (1994), Jake Plummer (1997)   43. St. Louis Cardinals – Dan Dierdorf, T, Michigan 1971 Honorable Mention: Matt Millen (1980), Mushin Muhammad (1996), Corey Dillon (1997)   44. Pittsburgh – Dermontti Dawson, C, Kentucky 1988 Honorable Mention: Chad Brown (1993), Sam Madison (1997), Kris Jenkins (2001)   45. Oakland – Dave Casper, TE, Notre Dame 1974 Honorable Mention: Joe Morris (1982), Ricky Watters (1991), Lofa Tatupu (2005)   46. Pittsburgh – Jack Lambert, LB, Kent State 1974 Honorable Mention: David Hill (1976), Larry Allen (1994), Samari Rolle (1998)   47. Cleveland – Jerry Sherk, DT, Oklahoma State 1970 Honorable Mention: Tony Collins (1981), Michael Barrow (1993), Frank Sanders (1995)   48. Oakland – Howie Long, DE, Villanova 1981 Honorable Mention: Lydell Mitchell (1972), Dwight Stephenson (1980), LeRoy Butler (1990)   49. San Francisco – Roger Craig, RB, Nebraska 1983 Honorable Mention: Delvin Williams (1974), Pete Johnson (1977), Brian Blades (1988)   50. Cleveland – Michael Dean Perry, DT, Clemson 1988 Honorable Mention: Tom Newberry (1986), Eddie Robinson (1992), Marcus McNeill (2006)   51. New Orleans – Rickey Jackson, LB, Pittsburgh 1981 Honorable Mention: Matt Blair (1974), Sean Jones (1984), Pepper Johnson (1986)   52. Miami – John Offerdahl, LB, Western Michigan 1986 Honorable Mention: Joe Devlin (1976), Bob Golic (1979), Mark Duper (1982)   53. Pittsburgh – Mel Blount, CB, Saginaw Valley State 1970 Honorable Mention: Harvey Martin (1973), Danny White (1974), Eric Davis (1990)   54. Minnesota – Sammy White, WR, Grambling State 1976 Honorable Mention: Jim LeClair (1972), Darrin Smith (1993), Anquan Boldin (2003)   55. Miami – Tim Foley, DB, Purdue 1970 Honorable Mention: John Mendenhell (1972), Randy Logan (1973), Corey Fuller (1995)   56. Dallas – Todd Christensen, TE, BYU 1978 Honorable Mention: Wesley Walls (1989), Jason Hanson (1992), Osi Umenyiora (2003)   57. Dallas – Mark Stepnoski, C, Pittsburgh 1989 Honorable Mention: Joe Ferguson (1973), Mark Carrier (1987), Devin Hester (2006)   58. San Francisco – Jeremy Newberry, C, California 1998 Honorable Mention: Gary Spani (1978), Ricky Proehl (1990), Travis Henry (2001)   59. Phoenix – Aeneas Williams, CB, Saginaw Valley State 1991 Honorable Mention: Jeff Hostetler (1984), Kirk Lowdermilk (1985), Marcus Washington (2000)   60. New Orleans – Pat Swilling, LB, Georgia Tech 1986 Honorable Mention: Quinn Early (1988), Kordell Stewart (1995), Darren Shaper (1997)

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All-Time NFL Draft (since merger)

If you haven't checked out Pro-Football-Reference.com lately you should as it isn't the completely useless site it used to be. This is a site that until recently didn't even have QB Ratings but now it has all kinds of neat features such as a searchable draft database. With the help of this I decided to do a quicky project for the blog by putting together an All-Time NFL Draft.   Now this isn't some all-time fantasy draft I'm doing but rather I'm selecting who in my opinion were the best players ever at each selection of the draft (i.e. Who is the best #1 pick of all-time?). To keep my sanity I'm only doing this since the 1970 NFL-AFL merger and I stopped at 30 picks although I might do another entry for more picks. Along with who I picked as the best player at each selection I also listed three "honorable mention" picks at each selection just to give you an idea of how many good players (or very average players for that matter with some of them) were taken at each selection. I originally thought of doing it based on who were truly the best draft picks for the team that originally drafted each player but that was going to be way too time consuming so I took the easy way out and just picked purely based on the player's career, regardless of where they had their most success.   1. Baltimore Colts (traded to Denver) - John Elway, QB, Stanford 1983 Honorable Mention: Eric Campbell (1978), Bruce Smith (1985), Peyton Manning (1998)   2. N.Y. Giants – Lawrence Taylor, LB, North Carolina 1981 Honorable Mention: Tony Dorsett (1977), Eric Dickerson (1983), Marshall Faulk (1994)   3. Detroit – Barry Sanders, RB, Oklahoma State 1989 Honorable Mention: Anthony Munoz (1980), Cortez Kennedy (1990), Chris Samuels (2000)   4. Chicago – Walter Payton, RB, Jackson State 1975 Honorable Mention: John Hannah (1973), Dan Hampton (1979), Jonathan Ogden (1996)   5. Atlanta – Deion Sanders, CB, Florida State 1989 Honorable Mention: Mike Haynes (1976), Junior Seau (1990), LaDanian Tomlinson (2001)   6. L.A. Raiders – Tim Brown, WR, Notre Dame 1988 Honorable Mention: James Lofton (1978), Walter Jones (1997), Torry Holt (1999)   7. Washington – Champ Bailey, CB, Georgia 1999 Honorable Mention: Phil Simms (1979), Sterling Sharpe (1988), Troy Vincent (1992)   8. San Francisco – Ronnie Lott, DB, USC 1981 Honorable Mention: Mike Munchak (1982), Willie Roaf (1993), Roy Williams (2002)   9. Houston Oilers – Bruce Matthews, G, USC 1983 Honorable Mention: Terry McDaniel (1988), Richmond Webb (1990), Brian Urlacher (2000)   10. Pittsburgh – Rod Woodson, DB, Purdue 1987 Honorable Mention: Marcus Allen (1982), Jerome Bettis (1993), Willie Anderson (1996)   11. Dallas – Michael Irvin, WR, Miami 1988 Honorable Mention: Dennis Harrah (1975), Wilber Marshall (1984), Dwight Freeney (2002)   12. Tampa Bay – Warren Sapp, DT, Miami 1995 Honorable Mention: Clay Matthews (1978), Jim Lachey (1985), Warrick Dunn (1997)   13. Kansas City – Tony Gonzalez, TE, California 1997 Honorable Mention: Franco Harris (1972), Mike Kenn (1978), Kellen Winslow (1979)   14. Buffalo – Jim Kelly, QB, Miami 1983 Honorable Mention: Randy Gradishar (1974), John Jefferson (1978), Ruben Brown (1995)   15. Denver – Dennis Smith, S, USC 1981 Honorable Mention: Isaac Curtis (1973), John L Williams (1986), Anthony Miller (1988)   16. San Francisco – Jerry Rice, WR, Mississippi Valley State 1985 Honorable Mention: Raymond Clayborn (1977), Luis Sharpe (1982), Troy Polamalu (2003)   17. Dallas – Emmitt Smith, RB, Florida 1990 Honorable Mention: Louis Wright (1975), Damien Woody (1999), Steve Hutchinson (2001)   18. Washington – Art Monk, WR, Syracuse 1980 Honorable Mention: Willie Gault (1983), Alfred Williams (1991), Eddie Kennison (1996)   19. Indianapolis – Marvin Harrison, WR, Syracuse 1996 Honorable Mention: Joey Browner (1983), Randall McDaniel (1988), Casey Hampton (2001)   20. L.A. Rams – Jack Youngblood, DE, Florida 1971 Honorable Mention: Mike Quick (1982), Will Wolford (1986), Steve Atwater (1989)   21. Minnesota – Randy Moss, WR, Marshall 1998 Honorable Mention: Lynn Swan (1974), John Alt (1984), Jerry Gray (1985)   22. Indianapolis – Andre Rison, WR, Michigan State 1988 Honorable Mention: Jack Reynolds (1970), Hanford Dixon (1981), Harris Barton (1987)   23. Cleveland – Ozzie Newsome, TE, Alabama 1978 Honorable Mention: Ray Guy (1973), Bruce Armstrong (1987), Ty Law (1995)   24. Baltimore Ravens – Ed Reed, S, Miami 2002 Honorable Mention: Raymond Chester (1970), James Brooks (1981), Eric Moulds (1996)   25. San Francisco – Ted Washington, DT, Louisville 1991 Honorable Mention: Stanley Morgan (1977), Bobby Butler (1981), Chris Hovan (2000)   26. Baltimore Ravens – Ray Lewis, LB, Miami 1996 Honorable Mention: Joe DeLamielleure (1973), Kent Hill (1979), Alan Faneca (1998)   27. Miami – Dan Marino, QB, Pittsburgh 1983 Honorable Mention: Reggie McKenzie (1972), Neal Anderson (1986), Larry Johnson (2003)   28. Tampa Bay – Derrick Brooks, LB, Florida State 1995 Honorable Mention: Guy Morris (1973), Darrell Green (1983), Trevor Pryce (1997)   29. Dallas (traded to L.A. Raiders) – Steve Wisniewski, G, Penn State 1989 Honorable Mention: Tommy Casanova (1972), Joe Cribbs (1980), Chris Spielman (1988)   30. Philadelphia – Eric Allen, CB, Arizona State 1988 Honorable Mention: Greg Pruitt (1973), Louie Kelcher (1975), Patrick Kerney (1999)

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Draftback: 1988 NFL Draft

NFL Draft is only three weeks away and this year it might actually go by at a relatively brisk pace with the shortened draft times. Since it is that time of year it's time for me to pick out a past NFL Draft and run down the first round from that year with little to no insight. I picked 1988 because it was 20 years ago, simple enough? 1988 featured several great wide receivers but little depth overall after the first two rounds. It's also the draft where there wasn't a single quarterback taken in the first two rounds and the first one taken in the 3rd round was Tom Tupa who would later become a punter.     1. Atlanta - Aundray Bruce, LB, Auburn   Lasted 11 years but only two of them were spent as a starter so that would definitely would equal to a bust for a #1 pick overall.   2. Kansas City - Neil Smith, DE, Nebraska   Good pick. Six Pro Bowls and over 100 career sacks.   3. Detroit - Bennie Blades, S, Miami   Halfway decent defensive back but not quite the career you'd hope for a pick this high. His brother Brian was taken in the 2nd round of this draft.   4. Tampa Bay - Paul Gruber, T, Wisconsin   12 year starter but kind of surprising he never went to a Pro Bowl as I seem to remember him being regarded as one of the better left tackles in the league during his prime. Maybe he just has a good rating Tecmo Super Bowl and that's why I thought he was good.   5. Cincinnati - Rickey Dixon, S, Oklahoma   Lasted five years, doing nothing of note.   6. L.A. Raiders - Tim Brown, WR, Notre Dame   Slam dunk future Hall of Famer.   7. Green Bay - Sterling Sharpe, WR, South Carolina   Was on his way to a Hall of Fame career it seemed before a neck injury cut it short in 1994.   8. N.Y. Jets - Dave Cadigan, G, USC   I honestly never heard of him but apparently he was a five year starter.   9. L.A. Raiders - Terry McDaniel, CB, Tennessee   Five time Pro Bowl selection.   10. N.Y. Giants - Eric Moore, G, Indiana   Another guard for a New York team that I have no memories of.   11. Dallas - Michael Irvin, WR, Miami   I don't think there is a football player I despised more than him.   12. Phoenix - Ken Harvey, LB, California   Selected to four Pro Bowls but he went to Cal and therefore he sucks.   13. Philadelphia - Keith Jackson, TE, Oklahoma   Very good receiving tight end who went to five Pro Bowls.   14. L.A. Rams - Gaston Green, RB, UCLA   Short career. Rushed for over 1000 yards in 1991.   15. San Diego - Anthony Miller, WR, Tennessee   Obviously overshadowed by the three receivers taken ahead of him but had a very good career as well.   16. Miami - Eric Kumerow, DE, Ohio State   Pretty impressive that we got 15 picks in before getting to a complete bust.   17. New England - John Stephens, RB, Northwest State   Made the Pro Bowl as a rookie but did little else after that.   18. Pittsburgh - Aaron Jones, DE, Eastern Kentucky   Played eight years but did anyone notice?   19. Minnesota - Randall McDaniel, G, Arizona State   12 Pro Bowl selections and should be a future Hall of Famer.   20. L.A. Rams - Aaron Cox, WR, Arizona State   Well the great run of wide receivers in this draft had to end eventually.   21. Cleveland - Clifford Charlton, LB, Florida   Bust.   22. Houston - Lorenzo White, RB, Michigan State   Had one great year in 1992 but didn't see a whole lot of carries in his career playing in the run and shoot.   23. Chicago - Brad Muster, RB, Stanford   Decent fullback who, like most running backs, had a short career.   24. New Orleans - Craig Heyward, RB, Pittsburgh   Very popular, fat fullback who died at age 39 due to brain cancer.   25. L.A. Raiders - Scott Davis, DT, Illinois   Not quite as good as the Raiders first two picks.   26. Denver - Ted Gregory, DT, Syracuse   Was cut during training camp. Seriously how does a team fuck up so bad on it's first pick that the guy can't even make it out of camp?   27. Chicago - Wendell Davis, WR, LSU   Pretty good receiver who's best known for having his career ended when he tore both ACLs while running a pass route on the god awful Veterans Stadium turf in 1993.   Other Notable Picks   29. Detroit - Chris Speilman, LB, Ohio State 30. Philadelphia - Eric Allen, CB, Arizona State 31. Cincinnati - Ickey Woods, RB, UNLV 36. N.Y. Giants - Jumbo Elliott, T, Michigan 39. San Francisco - Pierce Holt, DE, Angelo State 40. Buffalo - Thurman Thomas, RB, Oklahoma State 41. Dallas - Ken Norton, LB, UCLA 43. New England - Vincent Brown, LB, Mississippi Valley State 44. Pittsburgh - Dermontti Dawson, C, Kentucky 46. L.A. Rams - Flipper Anderson, WR, UCLA 49. Seattle - Brian Blades, WR, Miami 50. Cleveland - Michael Dean Perry, DT, Clemson 63. N.Y. Jets - Erik McMillan, S, Missouri 68. Phoenix - Tom Tupa, QB, Ohio State 74. N.Y. Jets - James Hasty, CB, Washington State 76. Indianapolis - Chris Chandler, QB, Washington 80. San Francisco - Bill Romanowski, LB, Boston College 125. Houston - Chris Dishman, CB, Purdue 159. Washington - Stan Humphries, QB, Louisiana-Monroe 239. Miami - Jeff Cross, DE, Missouri 252. Pittsburgh - John Jackson, T, Eastern Kentucky

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1998 Opening Day/Night Starters

Can you believe that it will be 10 years since the McGwire/Sosa homerun chase and 10 years since the Yankees tore through the American League on their way to an 114 win season? I really have nothing to add to that and I am just posting one of my random lists, this time around every team's Opening Day/Night starter from the '98 season. I went to every A's Opening Night game from 1995-2002 and in '98 it was actually a fairly momentous occasion as they were playing the Red Sox in Pedro Martinez's first ever start for them. Pedro dominated as expected but glancing at the boxscore I forgot it was also Dennis Eckersley's first appearance in Oakland since 1995 as he played his final year with the Sox. On to the list...   Angels: Chuck Finley Astros: Shane Reynolds Athletics: Tom Candiotti Blue Jays: Roger Clemens Braves: Greg Maddux Brewers: Cal Eldred Cardinals: Todd Stottlemyre Cubs: Kevin Tapani Devil Rays: Wilson Alvarez Diamondbacks: Andy Benes Dodgers: Ramon Martinez Expos: Carlos Perez Giants: Shawn Estes Indians: Charles Nagy Mariners: Randy Johnson Marlins: Livan Hernandez Mets: Bobby Jones Orioles: Mike Mussina Padres: Kevin Brown Phillies: Curt Schilling Pirates: Francisco Cordova Rangers: John Burkett Reds: Mike Remlinger Red Sox: Pedro Martinez Rockies: Daryl Kile Royals: Tim Belcher Tigers: Justin Thompson Twins: Bob Tewksbury White Sox: Jamie Navarro Yankees: Andy Pettitte

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Your Favorite Baseball Team Sucks

My favorite baseball team, and favorite team in all sports, the Oakland Athletics are going to suck this year. For the first time since the the late 90's I'm going into a baseball season with no hope or optimism. So since my favorite team is going to suck, I hope all your favorite teams suck this year too. Time for a little free floating hostility as I run down the other 29 teams in MLB and why they suck.   (Disclaimer: Don't take any of this seriously)   Angels: John Lackey's arm is about fall off and they'll find out that they wasted another $90 million on another overrated centerfielder. If Lackey does end up having surgery at some point hopefully they'll do something for his face too. God damn is that an ugly mother fucker.   Astros: Hey maybe they can bring back Roger Clemens again! That'll solve everything!   Blue Jays: They still play baseball in Canada?   Braves: No one gave a shit about them in Atlanta when they were good and no one gives a shit about them now that they suck. Move them to Alaska. For that matter move every professional sports franchise out of Atlanta.   Brewers: Anything that makes Bud Selig happy is a bad thing and the Brewers ever getting back to the playoffs will make him happy, so with that in mind I continue to hope for several more years of mediocre Brewers baseball. Signing Jason Kendall will of course help that cause for this year.   Cardinals: Seriously, fucking retire already LaRussa. Once you lucked out with the 2006 World Championship you should have done the George Constanza "Alright that's it for me! Goodnight everybody!"   Cubs: 100 years, no championships and now they are selling Wrigley Field's naming rights. Just kill yourself Cubs fans because it's gonna 100 more years of the same shit.   Diamondbacks: Would somebody kill Eric Byrnes already?   Dodgers: They're gonna trade Matt Kemp for Joe Crede, you just know it. Jeff Kent can't teach these kids how to win ya know!   Giants: HAHAHAHAHA...yes keep convincing yourself Giants fans and front office that you didn't need Barry. God I can't wait for the Summer when they are 30 games out of first place and averaging less than 10k fans a game. It's gonna be great! Seriously if they ever fire Brian Sabean I'm going to cry.   Indians: Seriously eat a fucking dick Cleveland for blowing it against the Red Sox in the ALCS to help that annoying fucking fan base celebrate another championship.   Mariners: Trading for Erik Bedard isn't going to cover up that this team vastly overachieved last year and Bill Bavasi is still the GM which will always lead to failure.   Marlins: Would somebody kill Jeffrey Loria already?   Mets: This team looks like it wants to go out of it's way to out perform the A's in the injury department this year. I personally approve of the failure of all New York teams so hopefully they'll crash and burn.   Nationals: Dmitri Young and Elijah Dukes on the same team...excellent.   Orioles: Batting 4th, Kevin Millar.   Padres: Padres' "fans" gave Barry Bonds a standing ovation when he tied Hank Aaron's record. At the end of the season Tony Gwynn Jr. hits a game winning triple against the Padres that forces them into a one game playoff against the Rockies which the Padres lose in crushing fashion. It's called karma, bitch.   Phillies: Would have been better off trading Kyle Kendrick to Japan for real and thrown Adam Eaton in the deal. Gonna be another cocktease year for Phillies' fans but like they give a shit anyways as they'll be too busy chanting "E-A-G-L-E-S" at the games.   Pirates: Not even worth it.   Rangers: Why does this franchise not get shit on more for being a complete joke? 47 years in existence and not a single playoff series win. They'll have no problem blowing by the 50 year mark and beyond.   Rays: Ooo they have so much young talent! They might be really good in 2010! Who gives a shit? Still going to be 90% Yankees and Red Sox fans at their games.   Reds: The fact that there are Reds fans who actually want to get rid of Adam Dunn tells me they deserve a manager like Dusty Baker.   Red Sox: Hey remember when we all thought it'd be great if the Red Sox won a championship so we could stop hearing all the whining from their fan base about "The Curse"? We never knew how good we had it. Every SAWX fan I see this year, I'm kicking square in the fucking nuts.   Rockies: Like the Indians, fuck you for losing to the Red Sox.   Royals: This team is more painful to watch than George Brett popping his hemorrhoids.   Tigers: Kenny Rogers is an asshole and Todd Jones is a closet fag.   Twins: 1. Trade Johan Santana, 2. ???, 3. Profit   White Sox: Is this team gonna suuuuuuuuuuck? YES!   Yankees: Derek Jeter is a selfish prick who is going to drag this franchise down very soon by his refusal to leave shortstop. This guy is the Lonnie Smith of shortstops. But whatever, Yankee fans deserve any losing season they get and hopefully they'll happen soon.

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Fantasy '86

Since 1995 I have played the computer version of Strat-O-Matic Baseball which might as well be Dungeons & Dragons for baseball geeks. I always order the updated version of the game online but they still send me the mail order form along with some little newsletter. I usually just glance at it and throw it away but something caught my eye this time. SportingNews.com in recent years has run some sort of fantasy baseball version of Strat-O-Matic but I've never been interested in it as it costs $25 a team. Well apparently very soon they will be running a free game that will be based on the 1986 MLB season where you can make up your own team of players from 1986. They are doing in conjunction with their 1986 Take Two promotion where "celebrities" are replaying that season. From what I know of with the Sporting News version of the game the leagues are 12 teams each, you draft 25 man rosters with a salary cap, and play a 162 game season. You don't actually "play" each other as the games are simulated but you can make trades and make line up adjustments during the season.   So I pose the question to my three blog readers...would anyone be interested in doing this? The website say it's a limited offer so I have no idea if I'll even be able to create a league but it sounds like an interesting alternative to typical fantasy baseball and best of all it's free. If I get a feeling that there will be enough interest on the board I'll probably create a thread for it in the Sports folder when they starting take sign ups, which will be February 27th.

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My Sports DVDs Update

I've made it no secret I'm a junkie for original televised footage of classic sporting events. Back in the day when ESPN Classic actually showed classic games I would love watching classic games from the 70's and 80's. I was thrilled when two years ago MLB started releasing complete World Series boxsets of the 1975, 1979, and 1986 World Series which I promptly bought all three and did write ups of all three sets on the blog. Last year two more World Series sets were released, 1977 and 1987 but I have yet to start watching either. Considering how bad the A's will be this season I might finally crack those sets open when looking for alternative things to watch during the baseball season. Both the NBA and NHL have followed suit although I'm not as interested in those sets as I am for baseball and football, but I would pick up the 1987 NBA Finals set if they ever release it as I have fond memories of it as a bandwagon Laker fan when I was younger. There has even been a set of "classic" Notre Dame games released which I did a write up the Cathlolics vs. Convicts game but haven't gotten around to viewing any of other the games.   The NFL had been a long time holdout when it comes to airing any classic games, even on their own channel, but last year around the Super Bowl they finally started re-airing original Super Bowl broadcasts which continued this year. Also this past Fall they released a handful of DVD sets and individual DVDs with "classic" games. Their choices so far have been a bit odd. They released three sets of every playoff game from the 1999 Rams, 2000 Ravens, and 2002 Bucs seasons. The '99 Rams set would be kinda interesting as that year's Super Bowl had probably the best finish ever in a Super Bowl but I really have no interest in anything from the last ten years and there's nothing "classic" on either '00 Ravens or '02 Bucs set. They also released the 1980 NFC Championship game between the Eagles and Cowboys. Now that'd be a must have for an Eagles fan but the game was not particularly competitive and why release that game instead of the 1981 NFC Championship featuring "The Catch"? In addition there is a three game set of "classic" Cleveland Browns games (yes I know, what classic Browns games?) but the three games they picked left a lot to be desired. One of the games is a regular season blowout from 1989 against the Steelers and another is a playoff clinching win against the Falcons from 2002. If they swapped out either of those games for their double overtime win in the '86 playoffs against the Jets I would have bought it.   Now there were two others that I did decide to pick up, the 1992 AFC Wild Card Game featuring the Bills record comeback against the Oilers and they released an 11 game set of the 1985 Chicago Bears season. I actually haven't received the Bears set yet as I got in on backorder from DeepDiscountDVD.com when it was on sale for only $44 a month ago but should be receiving it any day now. Now there are not any real "classics" on that Bears set but the '85 Bears always held a special place in my childhood because the Bears were the first "it" team for me that you just had to watch and as I've mentioned before my earliest sports memory is watching Super Bowl XX. On the set there is their MNF loss to the Dolphins that ended their undefeated season, which is actually kind of surprising as these sets are of course marketed to the fans of the teams but having that game on the set made it an automatic purchase for me as I don't know if I ever watched the original live game.   So here's my complete list of of sports DVDs, that have original games on them:   1975 World Series 1977 World Series 1979 World Series 1986 World Series 1987 World Series Notre Dame Collector's Edition (7 Games) 1992 AFC Wild Card Bills vs. Oilers 1985 Chicago Bears (11 Games)   In April MLB will be releasing the 2001 World Series boxset but again I'm not particularly interested in anything from the last decade, especially something that was televised by FOX, so I'm not sure if I'm going to pick that one up even if it was a true classic. Before then in early March there will be another World Series boxset released and, well....there's no fucking way I'm going to buy it.

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TSB Sim Season: Super Bowl

It's time for the Tecmo Super Bowl, uh Super Bowl, extravaganza! Here's recap of the playoffs.     San Francisco 49ers   Regular Season Results (13-3) 1: L – Giants 21-24 OT 2: W – Chargers 34-14 3: L – Vikings 24-27 OT 4: W – Rams 35-21 5: L – Raiders 14-21 6: Bye 7: W – Falcons 31-14 8: W – Lions 28-3 9: W – Eagles 27-9 10: W – Falcons 24-17 11: W – Saints 35-24 12: W – Cardinals 21-10 13: W – Rams 35-34 14: W – Saints 21-20 15: W – Seahawks 31-21 16: W – Chiefs 28-17 17: W – Bears 21-10   Offense Rankings Total: 2nd Pass: 2nd Rush: 23rd   Defense Rankings Total: 9th Pass: 18th Rush: 3rd   Offense QB: Joe Montana - 150/222, 3810 Yards, 41 TD, 12 Int RB: Roger Craig - 68 Att, 540 Yards, 2 TD RB: Tom Rathman - 114 Att, 726 Yards, 16 TD WR: John Taylor – 22 Rec, 510 Yards, 8 TD WR: Jerry Rice - 75 Rec, 1955 Yards, 21 TD TE: Brent Jones – 15 Rec, 365 Yards, 2 TD C: Jess Sapolu LG: Guy McIntyre RG: Harris Barton LT: Bubba Parris RT: Steve Wallace   Reserves QB: Steve Young RB: Dexter Carter, Harry Sydney WR: Mike Wilson, Mike Sherrard TE: Jamie Williams   Special Teams K: Mike Cofer – 58/59 XP, 6/10 FG P: Barry Helton – 11 Punts, 43.1 Avg   Defense RE: Kevin Fagan – 15 Sacks NT: Michael Carter – 2 Sacks LE: Pierce Holt – 7 Sacks ROLB: Bill Romanowski – 1 Sack RILB: Keith Delong LILB: Matt Millen – 1 Sack LOLB: Charles Haley – 13 Sacks RCB: Don Griffin – 2 Int LCB: Darryl Pollard FS: Ronnie Lott – 6 Int SS: Dave Waymer – 8 Int   Houston Oilers   Regular Season Results (10-6) 1: L – Raiders 21-30 2: W – Bengals 23-21 3: W – Chiefs 21-17 4: L – Patriots 17-35 5: Bye 6: W – Broncos 10-7 7: W – Jets 30-24 OT 8: W – Dolphins 35-14 9: W – Bengals 44-24 10: L – Redskins 24-27 OT 11: W – Cowboys 21-10 12: L – Browns 21-24 13: L – Steelers 20-28 14: W – Eagles 31-28 OT 15: W- Steelers 21-9 16: L – Browns 21-30 17: W – Giants 30-24 OT   Offense Rankings Total: 3rd Pass: 1st Rush: 26th   Defense Rankings Total: 19th Pass: 24th Rush: 15th   Offense QB: Warren Moon – 153/226, 3959 Yards, 38 TD, 20 Int RB: Lorenzo White – 86 Att, 620 Yards, 6 TD WR: Ernest Givins – 45 Rec, 1191 Yards, 13 TD WR: Haywood Jeffries – 32 Rec, 838 Yards, 7 TD WR: Drew Hill – 31 Rec, 701 Yars, 9 TD WR: Curtis Duncan – 43 Rec, 1176 Yards, 9 TD C: Jay Pennison LG: Mike Munchak RG: Bruce Matthews LT: Don Maggs RT: Dean Steinkuhler   Reserves QB: Cody Carlson RB: Allen Pinkett, Victor Jones, Doug Lloyd WR: Tony Jones, Gerald McNeil   Special Teams K: Tony Zendejas – 48/50 XP, 10/13 FG P: Greg Montgomery – 6 Punts, 47.3 Avg   Defense RE: Sean Jones – 11 Sacks NT: Doug Smith – 3 Sacks LE: William Fuller – 11 Sacks ROLB: Johnny Meads – 2 Sacks RILB: Al Smith LILB: John Grimsley – 2 Sacks LOLB: Ray Childress – 12 Sacks RCB: Richard Johnson – 4 Int LCB: Chris Dishman – 3 Int FS: Terry Kinard – 1 Int SS: Bubba McDowell – 2 Int     Super Bowl XXVI: San Francisco 49ers vs. Houston Oilers   1st Quarter   49ers won the coin toss but would turn it over immediately as Dexter Carter fumbled the opening kickoff as the Oilers recovered on the 49ers 30 yard line. They couldn't move the ball at all though and settled for a Tony Zendejas 45 yard field goal for a 3-0 lead. 49ers moved the ball into the Oilers territory on their first possession but Mike Cofer missed a 53 yard field goal. Warren Moon would hit Ernest Givins on a 46 yard catch and run on the next play which would eventually lead to another Zendejas field goal.   Houston 6, San Francisco 0   2nd Quarter   Mike Cofer missed another long field goal, this time 59 yards, and the Oilers looked to turn this into a rout early as they march down the field and Warren Moon takes it in himself from the 1 for a 13-0 lead. 49ers finally answered though with a quick drive that ended with a Tom Rathman 15 yard touchdown run. On the ensuing kick off Gerald McNeil is tackled in the endzone for a touchback...no wait it's Tecmo Rules so it's a safety! 49ers get the ball back and pull within a point on a Cofer field goal near the end of the half.   Houston 13, San Francisco 12   Halftime   Best. Halftime Show. Ever.   3rd Quarter     Oilers offense scuffles in the quarter as they fail to pick up a first down. After a long run by Rathman, Jerry Rice begins to make his presence felt as he catches 19 yard touchdown pass from Joe Montana to give the 49ers their first lead of the game.   San Francisco 19, Houston 13   4th Quarter     Oilers retake the lead on their next possession in part to a 29 yard Moon run and then Hill makes a leaping 39 yard touchdown grab. It's the 4th quarter though, and it's the Super Bowl, so you knew Montana would march the 49ers right back and it wasn't without drama. Oilers stuff Rathman on 3rd and Goal at the 1 but on the 4th and Goal Rathman scores the go ahead touchdown. Oilers still had enough time to comeback but they would lose 18 yards on three plays and then on 4th and 28 the great Tecmo computer logic shows up as they run the ball. It did catch the 49ers off guard as Lorenzo White rumbled for 13 yards but well short of the first down. As the 49ers tried to run out the clock Rathman fumbled on the Oilers 30 but it went out of bounds. The next play Rathman would take it the distance for his third touchdown of the game, wrapping up the Super Bowl MVP honors and a third Super Bowl title in four years for the 49ers. The 49ers ended the season on a 14 game winning streak.  

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TSB Sim Season: Conference Championships

AFC Championship: Houston Oilers vs. Los Angeles Raiders     Scoring Summary   HOU: White 4 Run LA: Allen 7 Run   HOU: Dishman 12 Interception   LA: Jackson 46 Run HOU: White 1 Run   LA: Horton 29 Pass from Schroeder HOU: Hill 57 Pass from Moon   Chris Dishman had two huge interceptions as the Oilers advance to their first ever Super Bowl. With the game tied, on the last play of the first half and backed up on their own 9, the Raiders inexplicably chose to pass instead of running out the clock and Jay Schroeder threw a pick six to Dishman to give the Oilers the lead going into the half. Then on the Raiders final possession in the 4th quarter, Dishman picked off Schroeder again on a 3rd and Goal to go to seal the game.     NFC Championship: Minnesota Vikings vs. San Francisco 49ers     Scoring Summary   SF: Craig 17 Run (Kick blocked)   Scoreless 2nd Quarter   SF: Cofer 52 FG Min: Reveiz 56 FG   Scoreless 4th Quarter   Pierce Holt had seven sacks in a defensive struggle as the 49ers win their third NFC Championship in four years. The Vikings had absolutely nothing going on offense amassing a pitiful 46 yards in total offense. This negated a superb effort by the Vikings defense that held the 49ers’ juggernaut of an offense to single digits.

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TSB Sim Season: Divisional Playoffs

AFC Divisional Playoff: Miami Dolphins vs. Los Angeles Raiders     Scoring Summary   LA: Allen 1 Run Mia: Stoyanovich 20 FG   LA: Jaeger 58 FG LA: Jackson 75 Run   Mia: Clayton 59 Pass from Marino Mia: Stoyanovich 45 FG   Mia: Duper 28 Pass from Marino LA: Horton 23 Pass from Beurlein   After squandering a couple of first half scoring opportunities the Dolphins appeared they would be on their way to another second half comeback playoff win but Steve Beurlein came off the bench for an injured Jay Schroeder to lead a 4th quarter touchdown drive for the win. The key sequence in the game came late in the first half when Mike Hardin intercepted a Dan Marino pass in the endzone and would be followed a few plays later by a 75 yard touchdown run by Bo Jackson to give the Raiders a 17-3 halftime lead.   NFC Divisional Playoff: Philadelphia Eagles vs. Minnesota Vikings     Scoring Summary   PHI: Sherman 14 Run   MIN: Fenney 1 Run PHI: Ruzek 50 FG   MIN: Carter 21 Pass from Wilson MIN: Fenney 28 Pass from Wilson   PHI: Barnett 38 Pass from Cunningham MIN: Carter 56 Pass from Wilson   Wade Wilson threw three second half touchdowns, two to Anthony Carter, as the Vikings continue their surprisingly strong season with a trip the NFC Championship Game. After killing the Redskins with both his arm and legs in the Wild Card round, QB Eagles was unable to break any big runs in this one.   AFC Divisional Playoff: Houston Oilers vs. Buffalo Bills     Scoring Summary   Scoreless First Quarter   Hou: Givens 54 Pass from Moon Hou: Hill 27 Pass from Moon   Buf: Mueller 1 Run Hou: Givens 57 Pass from Moon Buff: Reed 14 Pass from Kelly   Hou: Hill 31 Pass from Moon Buf: Thomas 64 Pass from Kelly   The Houston Oilers go into Buffalo in a playoff game and don’t blow a big lead! Warren Moon was unstoppable with four touchdown passes as he leads the Oilers to their first AFC Championship Game appearance in 12 years. Thurman Thomas had over 200 yards in total offense in the losing effort.   NFC Divisional Playoff: Los Angeles Rams vs. San Francisco 49ers     Scoring Summary   LA: Ellard 47 Pass from Everett SF: Craig 4 Run   LA: Warner 6 Run SF: Rice 4 Pass from Montana LA: Warner 4 Run   LA: Ellard 15 Pass from Everett SF: Rice 55 Pass from Montana SF: Craig 4 Run   LA: Gary 4 Run SF: Rice 12 Pass from Montana   SF: Taylor 65 Pass from Montana   In a classic shootout, the 49ers outlast in their divisional rival Rams in overtime 41-35. This game featured some “great” Tecmo computer logic in overtime as after the Rams won the coin toss the 49ers decided to catch the Rams off guard I suppose by going for an onside kick. It backfired and the Rams returned it to the 49ers 35. Then rather than try to move the ball closer the Rams elected to attempt a 52 yard field to win it but Mike Lansford’s kick hit the left upright. Joe Montana would hit a wide open John Taylor on the next play for the winning touchdown.

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HOF Profiles: Tim Raines

Tim Raines - Leftfielder   Montreal Expos 1979-1990, 2001 Chicago White Sox 1991-1995 New York Yankees 1996-1998 Oakland Athletics 1999 Baltimore Orioles 2001 Florida Marlins 2002   Awards 1986 N.L. Silver Slugger - OF 1987 All-Star Game MVP   All-Star Selections: 7 (1981, 1982, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1987)   League Leader 1981: Stolen Bases 1982: Stolen Bases 1983: Runs, Stolen Bases 1984: Doubles, Stolen Bases 1986: Batting Average, OBP, Runs Created 1987: Runs   Career Ranks Games: 48th Runs: 46th Hits: 68th TB: 100th BB: 33rd SB: 5th RC: 51st   Best Performance April 18, 1994 - Chicago at Boston Hit three homeruns against the Red Sox.   Hall of Fame Stats Black Ink: Batting - 20 (105) (Average HOFer ≈ 27) Gray Ink: Batting - 114 (176) (Average HOFer ≈ 144) HOF Standards: Batting - 46.8 (91) (Average HOFer ≈ 50) HOF Monitor: Batting - 90.0 (175) (Likely HOFer > 100)   Similar Batters in HOF: 5 (Lou Brock, Max Carey, Fred Clarke, Harry Hooper, Enos Slaughter) Other Similar Batters: Kenny Lofton, Willie Davis, Jimmy Ryan, Jose Cruz, Julio Franco     Year-by-Year Win Shares & Wins Above Replacement Level (WARP3)   1979: 0/0.0 1980: 0/0.1 1981: 18/5.6 1982: 21/5.5 1983: 29/9.1 1984: 32/9.0 1985: 36/11.8 1986: 32/9.9 1987: 34/10.3 1988: 19/6.4 1989: 25/8.1 1990: 19/5.1 1991: 19/6.5 1992: 28/10.2 1993: 19/5.9 1994: 14/4.6 1995: 14/4.8 1996: 7/2.1 1997: 9/3.3 1998: 11/3.3 1999: 1/0.6 2001: 3/1.4 2002: 0/0.1   Career Win Shares: 390 Career WARP3: 123.9   My Stupid Opinion   Second greatest lead off hitter of all-time who should be a slam dunk, first ballot Hall of Famer this year but won't be. In The New Bill James Historical Baseball Abstract, which was published in 2001 right near the end of Raines' career, James ranked Raines as the 8th best leftfielder of all-time behind Ted Williams, Stan Musial, Barry Bonds, Rickey Henderson, Carl Yastrzemski, Joe Jackson, and Al Simmons. You could make a legitimate argument that from 1985 to 1987 Raines was the MVP of the National League each season yet he failed to crack the Top 5 in the writer's vote in those years. Playing his prime years in Montreal and being overshadowed by Henderson certainly hurt the national media's perception of him. Maybe also hurt by that he probably hung around a few years longer than he should have but he'd hardly be the first HOF to do that. The very small sample of writer ballots that have become public are at least semi-encouraging as it appears he'll probably end up on between 30-40% of the ballots which isn't bad for someone the writers don't view as a first ballot HOF.

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